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20131202
20131210
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CSPAN 36
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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 7:00am EST
research in the world. basicssion is to do science to understand how life works at the most detailed level and to apply that in terms of coming up with new insights that will prevent and treat disease. support tens of thousands of grants across the country, conducted by our world's most cutting-edge scientists in the u.s. who are working on things from cancer to hiv, two aides. you name it -- to aids. you name it. let's learn more about the history. your roots date back to the late of thebut you are part department of health and human services. what is your budget and how many people work for nih? guest: it is about $29 billion. the number of people who work about on the campus is 17,000. most of our work is done by the grants that we give to universities and institutions all over the country. not getur money does spent in bethesda, but gets spent in those great universities where you are hearing every day about medical breakthroughs. that is because nih supported the work. how long have you been at nih? guest: 20 years ago is when i got here. we were working on the human genome project. p
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 4:00pm EST
been credited with new breakthroughs in the study of medical science, including aids and mental health. this morning on the "washington journal" we want to focus on the nih and give you an opportunity to find out more about the agency. francis s. collins joins us live. >> it is great to be here. >> you are the director of the nih. what is your objective? guest: we are the largest searcher -- researcher in the world. we focus on how life works at the most detailed level, and partly to apply that and come up with new insights that will prevent and treat disease. we support tens of thousands of grants across the country, conducted by our world's most cutting-edge scientists who are working from everything from cancer, to hiv-aids, two timers -- o all alzheimer's. you name it. we want to talk more about that, in terms of sequestration. you form to this as part of the department of health and human services. what is your budget? how many people work for the and age? billion.9 the number of people who work for us focus on the work that we do from the grants that we give across the country, a
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 6:00pm EST
and i in love not only with the concept of discovery and science that has to do with health but the extraordinary electricity of atmosphere here at the nih. new york for a year to complete the training as a en came back here senior scientist and have been here ever since. place.n extraordinary and diversity and interaction and communication is sometimes jokewe around but it isn't a joke. i would do it for nothing if i opportunity. it's such an exciting experience. appreciate the chance to talk to you and other experts on show our audience going there. this past week president talking aids aids as part of world day and another $1 million in aids resoeufplt here's what the had to saeufplt i want your reaction afterwards. announcedd aids day i drug llion for the aids assistance program which help people pay for life saving medications. was so ime the need great that over 9,000 people were on the wait list. vowed to get those numbers down. as of last week we have cleared the wait list. to zero and we'll it back.ing to get [applause] so we're making progress. we we're all here to
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 4:10am EST
. center for science in the public interest is doing that, but nothing has happened so far. legislation has a very long on- ramp. it takes a long time to make anybody do anything in congress. and part of that is due to corporate lobbying. other strategies, so far nothing. how about the farm bill? price subsidies create market distortion. it would be much better to get rid of all the subsidies and let every foodstuff reach it's appropriate market capitalization. that would work nicely. the problem is, the food industry would have a cow. the question is -- is that ok? is it ok for the food industry to have a cow? i think it is. finally, legal actions. this is the statement that got me to law school. the hyderabad statement. from an indian public health for. all significant advances in public health require and involve the use of law. when i heard that, i went, yes. that is exactly right. and that is why i came to hastings to get my masters. much shorter on-ramp. you can actually make something happen. you can do regulation through litigation. it is the most bang for your buck if you have cour
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2013 10:25pm EST
in reading, 17th in science, 25th in math. 34 nations. we're a better nation than that. to compete and remain internationally globally competitive, we have to change and we haven system to address the needs of our employers. it up to you open guys, but before we do that, manziel y, is johnny going to win the heisman again? >> i don't have a clue. i played six-man football. >> you're an aggie, you're yeah, baby, yeah. >> i don't have an idea. he is fun to watch play. here's what i will project. i will make a prediction -- that i'm very confident in and that is that texas a&m will beat the lsu this weekend in football. >> all right. lsu fans out here. >> bring that on, bobby jindal. >> come on, bobby. come on. >> let's open it up for questions. >> going to beat baylor. >> lsu -- >> we have a microphone? hand held microphone? okay, shout it out. >> that could be good. that could be good. >> can i ask the first question? first question. >> thank you. > what governor kasich said, not to say anything away from education. you did gloss over a little bit joe's fairness. asking about specifically taxe
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 10:00am EST
courage and enormous strength as well as he challenged us all to not just acknowledge the science of climate change, do understand that it is real and happening, but to also charge the cabinet to take immediate action. call me biased, but i believe it was his best speeches so far, although he is not done yet, i'm quite sure. climated through his action plan as well, which outlined some common sense, pragmatic steps that the epa and other agencies across the toinistration are now taking cut carbon pollution, invest in clean energy, to help our cities and towns build in more resilient ways so that they can add depth to a changing climate and keep our communities safe, but also to prepare to be a broader and more vocal leader on the issue of climate change in international discussions. as you know, in september, epa proposed urban pollution standards for new power plants using our authority that congress gave us under the clean air act. those power plant labor --ations our proposals regulations are proposals that would impact new facilities being constructed. new would ensure any fac
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 9:00pm EST
parents did, to pursue careers in medicine, science, education. many are proud business owners of law firms, restaurants, grocery stores, shipping companies and hair braiding venues. there are those who have come as asylum seekers, feeling war, famine and again side. they come to the united states to become productive tax paying members of our society. and like the other immigrant groups, immigrants are dealing with the back logged immigration processing, families being ripped apart, falling out of status because they were eeked out. racial and status discrimination, felony laws that prohibit judicial review, deportation processes that violate human rights and prohibitive student visa programs limited access to work permits and much, much more. mr. speaker, it is imperative for us to acknowledge the fact that many immigrants arrive on our shores during a time in their lives when they are most productive. the most productive years in their lives. bringing them to the floor would deny us as a nation the opportunity to access their talent, their skill and abilities in the prime of their
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2013 12:00am EST
science monitor. walden,esentative greg on to make haitians and technology. communications and technology. >> a several live events to tell you about tomorrow morning. treasury secretary jack lew will be at the future will trust to discuss the state of financial reform. also on c-span2, members of the house and energy commerce subcommittee on energy and power will hear from energy regulatory commissioners. span330 eastern a.m. on c- we cover a hearing on unemployment benefits that are set to expire at the end of the month. >> from age eight, betty ford, then betty [inaudible] put on skits and plays and that led to eddington, vermont where she studied at the school of dance. these are some of her notecards. no bookstworks -- where she kept cards. she carried this with her to vermont, back to grand rapids, off to new york where she studied with martha graham and work with the powers modeling agency and back to grand rapids again. you will find a host of things that you would find in just about any organizer. brochures on dance costumes, one of her sketches of a costume for one of the dance
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 7:00am EST
at mcdonald's anymore or burger king. none of the food tastes right. they had a science project to tell me how many people have food -- ieating good still eat chitlins. was 13.d smoking when i what is this stuff going on for? it is not making people live longer. it is making people live longer. the lifespan span in the united states is going up. sure what genetic modification has to do with that. if you are eating genetically modified foods, if you are eating foods from the supermarket, just from the produce section, the chances are you are not eating anything that is genetically modified. there is a long list of foods that are not genetically modified. the only ones that i know about for short that are available are the genetically out of five papaya from hawaii -- the only ones that i know about for sure that are available are the genetically modified papaya from hawaii. if you bought them from stateside supermarkets, they llyl come from genetica modified varieties. i have been told there are some squash that come from genetically modified varieties. the percentages, i have been told, are no
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 9:00pm EST
the world, the u.s. failed to score in the top 20 of reading, math, and science. randi weingarten says that that is because the u.s. has a higher poverty rate than other developed countries. hour.s just over one >> our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. this is her first visit with the group. she got an early look at the joys of helping children learn to turn mother was a teacher. she earned degrees from cornell university and a law degree from cardozo school of law. she worked at a wall street law form -- law firm for several years. she taught in brooklyn while serving as counsel for the president of the united federation of teachers. she served as president for 12 years before her election as a ft president in 2008. that ends the biographical portion of the program. as always, we are on the record here. please no live blogging retweeting or other means of filing well this is underway. there is no embargo on the breakfast. our friends at c-span have agreed not to air video of the session until one hour after the broadcast is over to give repor
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 1:50am EST
for the purpose of teaching branches of art, science, and industry, best calculated to enable the scholars to acquire an independent livelihood. recognizing the importance of being able to move beyond the menial work and menial wages to which most women of the day were subject, john simmons has enabled generations of women to lead and self advocate, empowered with their own resources. those of us who have delighted so enormously from john simmons's philanthropy are delighted to be with you to witness the work of our founders contemporary, angelina grimke. we hope you enjoy the evening, and thank you for joining us. [applause] >> we have got some powerhouses in the audience with us tonight. not just here on the stage. we want to acknowledge some of the remarkable women officeholders who are present as well as their male allies. i will ask each group to stand and remain standing. please hold your applause until the end. i know that is going to be tough but really try. we are honored to have present tonight a number of women who were each the first woman to hold a different statewide office.
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2013 9:00pm EST
in, my right hon. friends the business secretary and the science minister have also put in a huge amount of work, the enterprise zone is working well and it has attracted over 20 high-tech companies. pfizer is now staying, with 700 jobs as well. it has been a success and it shows that if you work together with the private sector, you can get good results like this. >> the disability benefits consortium of over 50 charities has signed a letter to the secretary of state for work and pensions calling for immediate action to exempt disabled people from the bedroom tax. why on earth do the prime minister and his government refuse to listen? >> obviously, what we have done is to exempt disabled people who need an extra room. this does, i think, come back to a basic issue of fairness, which is this people in private sector rented accommodation who get housing benefit do not get a subsidy for spare rooms, whereas people in council houses do get a subsidy for spare rooms. that is why it was right to end it, and it is right to end it thinking of the 1.8 million people in our country on hous
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 10:00am EST
. hosted by the christian science monitor. this is just over one hour. >> our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. this is her first visit with the group. she got an early look at the joys of helping children learn since her mother was a teacher. she earned degrees from cornell university and a law degree from cardozo school of law. she worked at a wall street law firm for several years. she taught history in brooklyn while serving as counsel for the president of the united federation of teachers. she served as president for 12 years before her election as aft president in 2008. that ends the biographical portion of the program. as always, we are on the record here. please no live blogging or tweeting or other means of filing well this is underway. there is no embargo on the breakfast. our friends at c-span have agreed not to air video of the session until one hour after the breakfast is over to give reporters time to file. give me a nonthreatening signal and i will call on one and all. low on the subtleties scale, but nonthreatening anyway. the n
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 12:30pm EST
all source analysts and combining these capabilities management,ion targeting, science and technology, bring to bear significant capability and these types off skills and capabilities, and others, they all brought of aneath the construct center concept. the integrated intelligence center construct, uniquely tied into our war fighting combat in and commands, part of the defense intelligence enterprise, provided full spectrum intelligence, synchronizing capabilities and eliminating redundancies. i will not stand here until you we will eliminate every redundancy, but i will tell you, it is one of the areas we have to try to work toward. understanding who is doing what to whom. as a longtime intelligence officer, you meet the demands of your customer. your customer is a commander. customerustom-made -- is the secretary of defense for the present, you answer that question. somebody else answers it for their boss, so be it. if somebody wants a call that redundant, so be it. inis the world we live in dealing with the here and now and the threats we face today and to keep us out of conflict,
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2013 4:00am EST
their role that way. this is not to say that law is a science or a mechanical enterprise. you obviously know that it is not. we disagree on many things. sometimes we disagree incredible -- we disagree in predictable ways that follow in our own theories of how to interpret the law, constitution, statutes. all of those are so different in thinking about policy and the way people in the clinical branches do. -- in the political branches do. that was when i was in my 30s. it was a different role. it was a different set of responsibilities. as a judge, i think about law and what i am doing and what i am called upon to do in a very different way. of all the things in my life that affect what i'm doing now, i honestly think that affected the least. one thing that i bring to the i guess table from those years is an understanding of how certain political processes work. sometimes it is relevant to particular cases that we may hear because of course, we do review a lot of executive branch decision-making. but other than that, the ways of thinking and the goals of what you are doing are pretty divergen
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 2:30pm EST
as a manageable medical condition. the science gives us great reason for optimism and hope. there are currently more than already safe and effective antiretrovirals drugs and combinations. researchers continue to develop new treatments. what is more, we're making progress to new medications and regimens that are longer lasting and simpler to use. far fewer side effects. those regimens reduce the amount of hiv in the body. that helps people living with hiv to stay healthy and live longer. we also know from the nih funding research, hiv transmission is drastically reduced when the amount of hiv virus in an affected person is reduced to undetectable levels. meanwhile, our partner agency, the fda, has approved new, rapid diagnostic test which can be used in a variety of settings to identify hiv in an infected individual. it might not be tested in a traditional health care setting. as we speak, nih grantees and scientists are exploring ways to treat hiv infections by administering anti-hiv antibodies. they have begun early-stage testing of an antibody that was effective in protecting human cells aga
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2013 9:00am EST
attention to a new report from the nation's premiere scientific body, the national academy of sciences. we typically associate climate change with gradual, longer term problems. according to the academy, climate change could also pose a risk of rapid hard to predict environmental changes that have the potential to cause widespread damage in the near term. the report warns that the collapse of the polar sea ice could send sea levels soaring. the destruction of the coral reefs could cause mass extinction of sea life, the elimination of summer sea ice in the arctic could alter the world's weather patterns. these tipping points could happen suddenly. it's reckless to do nothing in face of these threats. if there is a 10% chance that these threats would happen, it's irresponsible for us to ignore it. dr. richard alley, one of the authors said, you can't see it coming. you can't prepare for it. congress is irresponsible if we don't take this issue seriously. to pass on our planet worthy of our children and grandchildren's future. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. . the n
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2013 8:00pm EST
to this day keep in touch. then i went to a small arts and sciences college. the background behind that is interesting because i, like many of my brooklyn tech students, we thought we were fairly bright. in my case, i thought that i would do well in one of the big schools, the iv schools so to speak. i went to my college counselor -- i wasn't valedictorian was an ok student. i probably should have applied myself a little bit more. i went in with these grand ideas of wanting to apply to ivy schools and he suggested that maybe i should lower my expectations of little bit. apply to some of the schools. i applied to some other schools out of state because like most , we wanted to get far away from our parents. i applied to florida and virginia and alabama. i got accepted to all my schools. i always thought to myself, i should have just applied a little higher. i probably would have got in. it turns out that i don't have the money to go. they sent a financial aid package and the school i was supposed to go to was morehouse. i got accepted to morehouse, we were going to go. it was going
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2013 11:00pm EST
school. still to this day, keep in touch. i went to a small arts and science college. background behind that is i like many ecause of my brooklyn tech students fairly bright. in my case, ill thought that i would sort of do well at one of big schools, the ivy school, so to speak. nd i went to my college counselor and i wasn't the aledictorian and certainly salute torrian. i was an okay student. should have applied myself a little more. i suggested i go to the ivy school. e suggestled i lower the expectations a little bit. apply to some of the other schools. schools out other of state because like most kids then, we wanted to get far away from our parents. so i applied to florida and and i got d alabama accepted. and i thought to myself, i hould have applied a little higher. probably would have gotten in. graduated from high school, it have the i don't money to go. they send the financial aid package. go school i was supposed to to, actually, was moorehouse. i got accepted. were going toends go. it was going to be exciting. when the financial aid package came, wasn't much of a package. e
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 12:30am EST
judge describing their role that way. it is not to say that law is a science or a mechanical enterprise. you obviously know that it is not. we disagree on many things. sometimes we disagree incredible ways that follow from -- predictable ways that follow in our own theories of how to interpret the law, constitution, tatutes. all of those are so different in thinking about policy and the way people in the clinical branches do. -- elliptical branches do. that was when i was in my 30s. it was a different role. it was a different set of responsibilities. as the judge, i think about law and what i am doing and what i am called upon to do in a very different way. of all the things in my life that affect what i'm doing now, i honestly think that affected the least. one thing that i bring to the table from those years is an understanding of how certain political processes work. sometimes it is relevant to particular cases that we may hear because of course, we do review a lot of executive branch decision-making. but other than that, the ways of thinking and the goals of what you are doing are p
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2013 7:00pm EST
work will have to be done in and significant resources devoted to the areas of science and technology, including research and development. government is also convinced that organised labour is an important partner whose cooperation is crucial for the reconstruction and development of our country. that partnership requires, amongst other things, that our labour law be reformed so that it is in line with international standards, apartheid vestiges are removed and a more harmonious labour relations dispensation is created, on the basis of tripartite cooperation between government, labour and capital. the government is determined forcefully to confront the scourge of unemployment, not by way of handouts but by the creation of work opportunities. the government will also deal sensitively with the issue of population movements into the country, to protect our workers, to guard against the exploitation of vulnerable workers and to ensure friendly relations with all countries and peoples. the government is also taking urgent measures to deal firmly with drug trafficking some of which is carri
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 2:00am EST
science as well as i think the legal profession helping to decide which of these developments are appropriate. how can we best use them. caller: one the things i enjoy about talking to groups of judges is you have this group has the collective wisdom to figure out how to use this information to its best possible purposes and, of course, to avoid any potential harmful outcomes. i would like that thank you for your attention this morning and i would be happy to address any question is. [ applause ] >> we have time for two or three questions. please come up to the microphones in front. and remember, you will be immortalized on c-span. >> when you take swabs and tell you where you came from and what your future possibility medical problems are. how accurate are those predictions and is it worth the money? >> a great question. the question was what so-called direct to consumer testing where you send a saliva sample in to a company and they type your d.n.a. using what we call a d.n.a. chip and you get back a lot of information. information about your approximate ancestry and about y
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2013 10:00am EST
recognizes the gentleman from alabama, mr. brooks, for five minutes. mr. speaker, the science space and technology committee recently held a hearing on healthcare.gov cybersecurity threats. our bipartisan expert witness panel included dr. frederick check, a computer science professor at s.m.u., dr. ruben, a computer science professor at johns hopkins university, david kennedy, former chief security officer of dibold incorporated and currently the principal security consultant for trusted sec, and morgan write, formerly with cisco security and now c.e.o. of crowd sourced investigations. now i'm not a cybersecurity expert, but i can read the words of those who are. the s.s.t. committee's hearing charter informs members that in order to fully use healthcare.gov, american citizens must input or verify highly personal information such as date of birth and social security numbers for all family members, household salary, debt information, credit card information, place of employment, home addresses, and the like. information that is a treasure-trove for cybercriminals and identity thieves
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 12:00pm EST
medical condition. the science gives us great reason for optimism and hope. there are currently more than already safe and effective antiretrovirals drugs and combinations. researchers continue to develop new treatments. more, we're making progress to new medications and regimens that are longer lasting and simpler to use. far fewer side effects. those regimens reduce the amount of hiv in the body. that helps people living with hiv to stay healthy and live longer. we also know from the nih funding research, hiv transmission is drastically reduced when the amount of hiv virus in an affected person is reduced to undetectable levels. ,eanwhile, our partner agency the fda, has approved new, rapid diagnostic test which can be used in a variety of settings to identify hiv in an infected individual. it might not be tested in a traditional health care setting. as we speak, nih grantees and scientists are exploring ways to treat hiv infections by administering anti-hiv antibodies. they have begun early-stage testing of an antibody that was effective in protecting human cells against more than any
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2013 9:00pm EST
in the history of the social science research network. our third witness is simon lazarus, a senior counsel with the constitutional accountability center. he is a member of the administrative conference of its eight. he has served as the public counsel for the national senior citizens law center. mr. lazarus has written articles appeared in law journals as well as publications such as "the atlantic," "the washington post," and "the new republic." our final institute -- witness has been recognized as an influential expert on the affordable care act. cannon has appeared on abc, cbs, cnn and fox news and has that have beens featured in numerous newspapers 6 c1 journal, usa today and the los angeles times. he is the coeditor of a book on replacing the affordable care act and the co-author of a book on health care reform. i would like to thank all of the witnesses for their appearance today. each of your written statements entered into the record in its entirety. i ask that each witness summarize his or her testimony in five minutes or less. there is a timing light on your table. when the light
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 7:00pm EST
ranking of students around the world, the u.s. failed to score in the top 20 of reading, math, and science. randi weingarten says that that is because the u.s. has a higher poverty rate than other developed countries. hour.s just over one >> our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers.
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 1:00am EST
% of teachers, we are talking about math, science, literacy -- embrace it. only two percent or three percent inc. it will lead to lower or worse results. others are not taking up position. when you have that embracing of a concept and teachers and administrators have had the time to look at what people want to emphasize, they are moving in the right direction. we have seen no movement to delay or abandon our common core. we need to hold ourselves accountable for success. >> it you think about the common core? what are the key strengths? is there anything about the implementation you are nervous about? >> there are fewer things but deeper. the ability to use those things we are learning successfully. whether it is in support of critical thinking or in mathematics being able to answer it promptly, i think that is the real strength. i think one-size-fits-all has not been working particularly well. we do it in the hopes that they will devote the rest of their lives to the education system. that was not working as well as it needed to on an international basis for the united states. we decided to go
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2013 10:00am EST
in agricultural sciences and earning his masters in business from delaware valley college, eric went to work for the pennsylvania department of agriculture. there he administered the rural youth grant program, led the county fair and agri tourism division and director for the central office in that department. he holds several leadership roles in the marcellus shale coalition, bringing together the two most important industries, energy and agriculture. eric is well deserving of this honor and we thank him for his leadership in the field of agriculture and agricultural education. thank you, mr. speaker and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. waxman, for five minutes. mr. waxman: thank you very much, mr. speaker. on february 15, a small group of democratic members of the house joined together to form the safe climate caucus. we vowed to come to the house every day to talk about the defining environmental challenge of our time, climate change. today marks the 100th day we have spoken on
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2013 7:00am EST
in the united states, saying it is the transportation and science committee -- as we move forward towards integrating drones into civilian life and capitalizing on the economic opportunities they offer, we must make certain that these aircraft's meet rigorous safety and privacy standards. the commerce committee said the hearing was already in the works before the amazon announcement on sunday. her knees from hartsdale, new -- bernice from hartsdale, new york on our support line. favor of using the drones because i just enrolled in a prescription d plan on medicare. i will get the best price if i use mail order to obtain my drugs. i take 14 prescription drugs. it is very difficult to keep things in order. in order to get the prescription i haveelivered on time, to call two weeks ahead of time. it seems insurmountable. however, if i saw that i was running out of drugs and they could be delivered in a half hour, it would be most helpful. i think for old ladies on prescription d, it might be a help. host: that is bernice from new york. this,ve probably heard but -- dylan from alabama, you are
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2013 7:00am EST
, no matter how science fiction it feels to think about that happening, it could easily happen and it is our job to stop it. host: we have this tweet from calamity jane -- host: what do you say to that argument? syria rightis in now as a proxy terrorist. they are in all of these places doing bad things. they are in afghanistan. they have not invaded because that is not what these countries do. what these countries -- by these countries i mean countries like , they have proxy terrorists. they fund, promote, and train bad actors in their state and then send them out to other countries to destabilize. front page this morning of "the new york times." "jihadist groups gain turmoil across the middle east, planning violence to present new opportunities for jihadist groups across the middle east to raise concerns among american intelligence and counterterrorism officials that militants aligned with al qaeda could establish a base in syria capable of threatening israel and europe. -- europe." guest: that is absolutely true, especially in syria. you have a line from syria to iraq. that is how they get
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)